Root Cause Analysis

I’ve moved on to a new project recently. It’s quite different from the previous one. Before I worked on a monolythic web application, now we’re using OSGi. As a result, our project consists of a lot of sub-projects (OSGi bundles) which makes it very inconvenient to use Ant. So we’ve switched to Gradle. Our company has also standardized on Perforce, where we used Subversion before.

To summarize, a lot has changed and I’m not really up to speed yet. This is evidenced by the fact that I broke our build 4 times in 5 days. As an aspiring software craftsman, I feel really bad about that. So why did this happen so often? And can I do anything to prevent it from happening again? Enter Root Cause Analysis.

Root cause analysis is performed to not just treat the symptoms, but cure the disease:

The key to effective problem solving is to first make sure you understand the problem that you are
trying to solve – why it needs to be solved, how you will know when you’ve solved it, and what the
root cause is.
Often symptoms show up in one place while the actual cause of the problem is somewhere
completely different. If you just “solve” the symptom without digging deeper it is highly likely that
problem will just reappear later in a different shape.

Henrik Kniberg has written about one way of doing root cause analysis: using Cause-Effect diagrams. Using this method, I ended up with the following:

Build Failure Cause Effect Diagram

I started out with the problem: Build Failure, in the orange rectangle. I then repeatedly asked myself why this is a bad thing and added the effects in the red rectangles. Just repeat this until you find something that conflicts with your goal. Finally, I repeatedly added causes in blue rectangles. You can stop when you’ve found something you can fix, but in general it’s good to keep asking a bit deeper than feels comfortable. This is where the Five Whys technique comes in handy.

As you can see, my main problem is impatience. For those who know me, that won’t come as a surprise ;) However, in this case this personal flaw of mine gets in the way of my goal of making customers happy.

With the causes identified, it’s time to think up some countermeasures. Pick some causes that you can fix, and think of a way to treat them. The ones I’m going to work on are marked with a star in the figure above:

  • Use a checklist when submitting code to the source code repository. This will prevent me from making silly mistakes, such as forgetting to add a new file
  • Take the time to learn the tools better, in particular Gradle and Groovy
  • In general, try to be more patient

The last one is the hard one, of course. Wish me luck!

Update 2010-08-01: I have created a checklist with things to consider before submitting code to our Perforce repository and used this checklist all week. I broke the build twice this week, both times because of special circumstances that were not accounted for on the checklist. So I think I’m improving, but I’m not there yet.

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3 Responses to Root Cause Analysis

  1. […] we should do a root cause analysis to determine why this weakness slipped through the cracks in the first place. Armed with that […]

  2. […] changed, so that when you get back online, you forget to submit some files and break the build. That has happened to me quite a few times now, because the reconcile feature is not available in P4SWAD. You need to use […]

  3. […] of you who don’t know it, the bowling game (ten-pin) is almost the Hello, world! of TDD. I want to learn Groovy, but I’m going to re-do it in Java first, so that I have recent code and feelings to compare […]

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